Intercept Co-Founder Resigns Because Colleagues Wouldn’t Let Him Criticize Joe Biden

Intercept Co-Founder Resigns Because Colleagues Wouldn’t Let Him Criticize Joe Biden

The Intercept Co-Founder Glenn Greenwald announced his resignation from the online publication Thursday after editors reportedly refused to allow Greenwald to raise questions about recent scandals plaguing Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

“The Intercept’s editors, in violation of my contractual right of editorial freedom, censored an article I wrote this week, refusing to publish it unless I remove all sections critical of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, the candidate vehemently supported by all New-York-based Intercept editors involved in this effort at suppression,” Greenwald wrote in a column on Substack. “The censored article, based on recently revealed emails and witness testimony, raised critical questions about Biden’s conduct.”

Greenwald added that Intercept editors went as far as to refuse Greenwald the freedom to publish the content with any other publication. They also, he says, declined his offer to refute his claims with an article of their own challenging Greenwald’s assertions and letting readers decide.

“But modern media outlets do not air dissent; they quash it,” Greenwald wrote. “So censorship of my article, rather than engagement with it, was the path these Biden-supporting editors chose.”

Greenwald has been a reliable critic of the way mainstream outlets have handled recent blockbuster reporting on information on a Delaware laptop that evidence indicates belonged to Hunter Biden, Joe Biden’s son and possible business associate.

Last week, The Intercept co-founder blasted legacy media’s “cone of silence” surrounding the Biden family on Fox News’ “Tucker Carlson Tonight” and chastised claims from House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff that the laptop stemmed from a Russian disinformation campaign.

“He’s simply lying when he just asserts over and over that the Russians or the Kremlin are behind this story,” Greenwald said of Schiff on the prime-time program. “He has no idea whether or not that’s true. There’s no evidence to support it.”

Greenwald worked as a columnist for Salon before joining The Guardian in 2012, where he rose to prominence breaking stories about documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.

Tristan Justice is a staff writer at The Federalist focusing on the 2020 presidential campaigns. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at [email protected]
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