PBS Reporter Defends Riot-Cheerleading 1619 Project Writer As A ‘National Treasure’

PBS Reporter Defends Riot-Cheerleading 1619 Project Writer As A ‘National Treasure’

PBS White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor praised the architect of The New York Times’ anti-American “1619 Project” as a “national treasure” Thursday while President Donald Trump railed against the Times’ revisionist history infecting American classrooms before announcing the “1776 Commission” to promote patriotic education.

“An important note that as President Trump gears up to attack the 1619 project, [Nikole Hannah-Jones] is a national treasure who put in context how America came to be,” Alcindor wrote on Twitter. “We should all be grateful for the 1619 Project.”

It was a fitting defense from a fitting reporter. Each of the legacy outlet representatives this year played a part in fomenting the violence sweeping the nation. Alcindor employed blatant double-standards over coronavirus social distancing and Hannah-Jones encouraged the destruction explicitly.

In a response to a New York Times column in June proposing to call the historic outbreak of civil unrest “the 1619 riots,” Hannah-Jones said, “it would be an honor.” Hannah-Jones, who once called the white race “barbaric devils” and claimed legendary explorer Christopher Columbus was no different than Adolf Hitler, also claimed in early June at the onset of the explosive riots that destroying property wasn’t violence because “property can be replaced,” to which the interviewing CBS reporter responded with saying that’s “a great point.”

Meanwhile, Hannah-Jones’ project, for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize despite a major correction and numerous critiques from historians has made its way into schools across some 4,500 classrooms. True to form, The New York Times responded by saying they just didn’t care.

[Watch a short documentary debunking the project here.]

Alcindor tried (and failed) to fact-check the president on the presence of anarchists seizing the nation’s cities while confronting the president about race at every turn, even prior to George Floyd’s death.

During White House coronavirus press briefings, Alcindor accused U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, who is black, of being racist for employing terms commonly used in his family, and attacked the president for using the phrase “Kung Flu” to refer to the novel Wuhan coronavirus from China.

As I wrote in June after Alcindor received a prestigious award from the White House Correspondents’ Association, Alcindor is as much a journalist as Hannah-Jones is a historian. Each believes they’re doing something righteous in the face of abject racism when really they’re just breeding division through deceit, eroding what was left of media credibility in the process.

Tristan Justice is a staff writer at The Federalist focusing on the 2020 presidential campaigns. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at [email protected]
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