It Must Be Horrible Thinking Everyone Is Racist

It Must Be Horrible Thinking Everyone Is Racist

I was turned down for a lease on a new apartment Sunday, and it was no secret why.

I’m not a smoker, I don’t have any pets, my credit is in good shape and I have no criminal history, at least in the eyes of the law. Through the lens of progressive wokesters under our new world order however, my crime was committed in 2016 when I cast a ballot for Donald Trump.

Never mind why. The landlord wasn’t sincerely interested after asking within the first 60 seconds of our FaceTime chat who I supported four years ago, turning me away explicitly because of who I voted for in the last election while calling me a racist who posed a significant danger to the largely minority neighborhood in the process.

Other than my electoral history, she never learned anything about me, like the fact that most of my friends happen to be non-white gay people. Of course just saying that is likely to trigger accusations of racism from self-proclaimed social justice warriors since nothing, literally nothing a white person can say without bowing down to the radical demands of Black Lives Matter can exonerate the inherent racism, which is racist in and of itself.

I’m not sharing this story to claim abject victimhood. Quite the opposite actually. I genuinely felt sorry for the woman on the phone who began to lob charges of white supremacy at me based on a single vote cast along with nearly 63 million other people.

In fact, I repeatedly apologized, not for my vote, but for her own corrupted intolerance that led her to so hastily vilify me as unworthy of being a rent-paying tenant.

It must be exhausting for those who believe that anyone who disagrees with them in the slightest is evil and racist. What a horrible way to live.

Yet as polarization reaches new heights in our new woke era, the position that anyone on the right poses a literal threat to the safety of minorities has begun to become an accepted doctrine among our mainstream elites. Just this week, a New York Times opinion page editor was forced to resign over the act of publishing an op-ed from a U.S. senator and combat veteran. The senator’s argument? That the president ought to invoke the Insurrection Act to restore order to a nation that had just suffered the worst outbreak of civil unrest in recent history.

“Running this puts Black @nytimes staffers in danger,” Times colleagues wrote on Twitter voicing their outrage publicly.

Of course, if any Times staffer were to genuinely believe their paper was putting their own lives at risk for publishing an alternative viewpoint, they likely wouldn’t be working there. On whether they actually believed the Times editor who left as a result of the outrage circus is a racist however, there’s no doubt.

The idea that America is saturated with 63 million white supremacists is now no longer an idea from a fringe left-wing movement but has now infected the psyche of the broader society convinced by liberal academics and legacy media that the U.S. is an irredeemably racist empire built for the sole purpose of oppressing black people.

The insidious projection that Americans are racist by default with catchy slogans such as “silence is violence,” which is really just code for holding one’s morality hostage to extract submission, must be draining on the individuals who employ them.

Racism is evil, and should be condemned at every turn. Nearly everyone, save for a few extremists, agrees. Deeming one as racist therefore, characterizes them as worthy of condemnation in the highest degree.

The left’s radical expansion of what it means to be racist however, has trapped individuals in the bondage of their own ideology, severing connections before they can even be created and deepening dark divisions down an bottomless fissure. In turn, the newly constructed psychic reality for those convinced of the leftist dogma identifying racism are living in a terrifying pandemic of discrimination where nearly everyone is racist and the only possible vaccine is complete repentance for past generations’ sins.

That must be as exhausting as it is sad.

Tristan Justice is a staff writer at The Federalist focusing on the 2020 presidential campaigns. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at [email protected]
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