Best Tweets Of The Seventh And Final Democrat Primary Debate

Best Tweets Of The Seventh And Final Democrat Primary Debate

It’s January, it’s Iowa, and it’s an election year. You know what that means? Yes, it’s when everyone pretends to like ethanol, but why? It’s beginning to look a lot like caucus time! And there’s no caucus without a pre-caucus debate.

If you had better things to do than watch CNN for two and a half hours, never fear: The Federalist has collected the best tweets of the evening for your reading pleasure.

If you’ve watched the last six rounds, you knew what you were in for:

The introductions, at least, were brief. Only six candidates made the cut.

Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and … wait, who’s that in the plaid tie?

Oh yeah, the billionaire coal mine owner who hates billionaires and coal. Anyway, on with the show. On to Tehran For the first time, the debate began with a question about foreign policy.

Bernie and Joe talked about how the voted on the Iraq War, several decades ago.

The others chimed in:

Though on the question of America’s role in the Middle East, one strident voice was noticeably absent.

Well, two voices, really

Inevitably, the talk turned to the Vietnam War, which ended forty-five years ago.

Bernie fell back on internationalism, of course.

There was some hair-splitting by Warren and Klobuchar.

Biden wrote a kōan, I think?

On the authorization for war, all condemned Trump’s strike on Qasem Soleimani without congressional authorization. But some were for it before they were against it.

It was a little surreal.

Bernie Hates NAFTER Next up was trade. They all hated USMCA. Some of them hated NAFTA. No one explained the difference.

Most candidates tried to sound protectionist while still attacking the protectionist in the White House. Not an easy task! Steyer sounded the strongest note for free trade.

Biden kind of winked at it.

Warren’s would have China pinky swear not to pollute too much before sending our jobs there. Progressive!

He Said, She Said They moved on to the fight CNN had wanted to start all night. Did Bernie really say that thing Warren said he said that one time?

Warren spun the conversation into a women-can-do-anything moment, noting the extremely specific stat that she was the only candidate on stage who had beaten an incumbent Republican in the last thirty years. It was one of those “find endpoints that make this a unique event” things that sports announcers sometimes do. Bernie objected, noting that he had defeated a Republican incumbent, back in 1990. A surprisingly long discussion ensued about who long ago 1990 was.

Surely there were better ways to make herself seem special, no? Warren is the only candidate on stage to beat a Republican incumbent in a state with a seacoast! Warren is the only candidate to beat a Republican who was, herself, a Republican until 1996! Warren is the only candidate to beat a Republican incumbent in a state where Democrats outnumber Republicans by more than 3-to-1! Or here’s an even better one:

Cradle to Grave Once the vagaries of the Gregorian calendar were sorted out, it was time for everyone’s favorite topic, yelling large numbers at each other. That’s right: it’s healthcare time. President Obama and a Democratic Congress passed a massive overhaul of the healthcare industry, but according to his six would-be successors, things are as bad as ever. Nothing in their answers had changed from the previous six debates.

Klobuchar kept things a little interesting.

Next up: childcare, and how the government can get you do do it the way they want (the answer is other people’s money).

Biden talked about the days when he was a poor single parent on a mere United States Senator’s salary.

(I mean, he had some serious tragedy in his life back then, but he wasn’t poor.) They all had some plans for your money. Vague plans, but big plans.

Closing “Thoughts” There was some talk about impeachment.

Tom Steyer eyeballed an anxious nation.

The masses yearned for release.

Finally, it was all over…or was it?

Kyle Sammin is a lawyer from Pennsylvania, a senior contributor to The Federalist, and the co-host of the Conservative Minds podcast. Read some of his other writing at his website, or follow him on Twitter at @KyleSammin.
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