‘Facts Die But the Narrative Lives On’: The Twitter Manifesto of Ben Trovato

‘Facts Die But the Narrative Lives On’: The Twitter Manifesto of Ben Trovato

It was inevitable. Once I dragged Ben Trovato—the mysterious King of the Narrative—into public notice, it was only a matter of time before he started his own Twitter feed.

Incidentally, I did a little research and found that there are a couple of different folks out there operating under the name “Ben Trovato”—a humor columnist in South Africa and a sleazy Tumblr devoted to an odd kind of “fashion photography” in which the women never seem to be wearing much in the way of actual clothing. But I’ve done my due diligence and can assure you that this Ben Trovato, @TrovatoBen, is the real, genuine Ben Trovato. I would stake the accumulated credibility of the entire journalism profession on it.

Now that he is up and actively posting on Twitter, we’re starting to learn a lot more about him, such as his favorite vacation destination (Kyrzbekistan, of course) and the latest additions to his résumé (special advisor to the president of the University of Virginia).

He has even posted a Twitter manifesto explaining why he does what he does. It turns out there is a whole philosophy behind it. And it also turns out that Ben Trovato is embracing his new place in the limelight and wants to take credit for the work he has heretofore done behind the scenes. Here is what he had to say, 140 characters at a time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agree or disagree with this manifesto, it is at least useful to have the mentality of modern narrative journalism laid out for us. And it will be instructive to track the pervasive influence of the personal embodiment of the narrative.

Follow @TrovatoBen on Twitter.

Robert Tracinski's work can also be found at The Tracinski Letter.
Related Posts