If Black Lives Matter Gives A Crap About Black Lives, It Will Retract Its Ma’Khia Bryant Statement

If Black Lives Matter Gives A Crap About Black Lives, It Will Retract Its Ma’Khia Bryant Statement

Black Lives Matter, as an organization far more interested in deconstructing the nuclear family, expanding transgender dogma, and dismantling institutions than in actually improving black lives, has frequently shown that its semantically strategic name is a misnomer. After the police shooting of Ma’Khia Bryant, the organization released a statement that unmistakably confirmed it: BLM doesn’t actually think all black lives matter — only those who fit its narrative.

“At the exact same time the verdict of Derek Chauvin was being read for murdering George Floyd, police wasted no time in senselessly taking another Black child,” the organization said in reference to the teenager who died in a fatal police shooting last week in Columbus, Ohio. “Ma’Khia Bryant. We say her name.”

The statement continued, asserting as fact that Bryant had called police for help, although investigators are probing and haven’t confirmed who made the 911 call. The claim that it was Bryant came from family members — the same family members who said the 16-year-old knife-wielding girl “promoted peace,” had a “motherly nature,” “didn’t have no knife or nothing in her hand,” and was a “15-year-old girl,” making them less-than-reliable sources.

“Columbus police officer Nicholas Reardon showed up and shot this 16-year-old child point blank within a matter of seconds,” BLM said. “Another Black life stolen with no regard.”

What the Marxist and race-baiting organization failed to note was that between the time “Nicholas Reardon showed up” and when he discharged his firearm, Bryant lunged at two of the other black girls who were present, pinning one of them against a car and cocking her arm back with a knife in her hand ready to strike. It wasn’t “with no regard” that Reardon fired his gun. It was precisely to save another black life.

Black Lives Matter statement

Of course “Ma’Khia Bryant’s life mattered,” as BLM says, but so does the life of her would-be victim. If Black Lives Matter really cared about black lives, it would recognize that thanks to Officer Reardon’s brave and decisive action, he spared at least one black girl from a brutal stabbing.

Law enforcement acting ethically and responsibly to protect and serve black communities, however, doesn’t exactly gin up enthusiasm for Black Lives Matter’s efforts to defund the police. Stories of cops saving black girls from grisly violence don’t incite the kind of revolutionary violence that turns cities into hellscapes, garnering national attention for so-called racial justice. Honest depictions of white officers saving black lives won’t prompt Americans to click that “donate” button on the BLM website.

The organization did the same thing with Jacob Blake. Did the lives of his black children matter? Why didn’t the organization have anything to say about David Dorn, the black police officer who was murdered during the deadly riots of 2020? Didn’t his life matter more than the TVs looters were trying to steal? BLM claims to advocate for immigrants and other minorities too. Is it going to say anything about Mohammad Anwar, the 66-year-old Pakistani immigrant who was killed in a brutal carjacking in Washington D.C. last month, allegedly by two black teens who were captured on video?

Ma’Khia Bryant was a human being, created in God’s image, with likely much life left to live. But that isn’t why her life mattered to BLM, an organization that makes its millions and perhaps billions by exploiting pain, outright lying about the facts of police shootings, and ignoring the black lives that aren’t quite as lucrative.

“The call for Black lives to matter is a rallying cry for ALL Black lives striving for liberation,” Black Lives Matter announces on its website. But it’s propaganda. The only black lives that matter to BLM are those they can monetize — and the “girl in pink” isn’t one of them.

black lives matter ma'khia bryant

Kylee Zempel is an assistant editor at The Federalist. Follow her on Twitter @kyleezempel.
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