Trump Pledges To Continue Legal Challenges Contesting Election Despite Electoral College Vote

Trump Pledges To Continue Legal Challenges Contesting Election Despite Electoral College Vote

President Donald Trump pledged Sunday to push forward with a barrage of legal challenges contesting the outcome of the November election despite a pending vote of certification by the Electoral College Monday.

“It’s not over,” Trump told Fox News’ Brian Kilmeade on “Fox & Friends” outside the annual Army-Navy football game. “We keep going and we’re going to continue to move forward. We have numerous local cases.”

Trump reiterated his claims of victory in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Georgia, while emphasizing ongoing litigation in Wisconsin. As of this writing, former Vice President Joe Biden has carried all four, landing the Democratic candidate his first four years in the White House with 306 electoral votes to Trump’s 232 scheduled to make the vote official Monday.

The president maintains however, that the contest was “a rigged election.”

“They gave us very little time,” Trump complained as judges throw out campaign lawsuits. “But we caught them, as you know, as fraudulent, dropping ballots, doing so many things, nobody can even believe it.”

Whether election fraud in a year featuring record turn-out in the form of mail-in voting — the most prone to voter fraud — was compromised enough to tip the contest in the Democrats’ favor remains to be seen, pending claims to be prove in court. Whether voter fraud actually occurred however, there’s no doubt.

On Friday, the Supreme Court dealt a major blow to the campaign’s efforts to block the Electoral College from certifying the presidential vote Monday by rejecting a Texas lawsuit joined by several other states challenging the constitutionality of elections in four key swing states.

Trump railed against the court’s decision.

“All they did is say we don’t have standing,” Trump said. “So they’re saying essentially the president of the United States and Texas and these other states, great states, they don’t have standing.”

Tristan Justice is the western correspondent for The Federalist. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at [email protected]
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