Wikipedia Is Now Trying To Eliminate The Federalist’s Online Entry

Wikipedia Is Now Trying To Eliminate The Federalist’s Online Entry

Yep. It just happened. The science-loving censors at Wikipedia, not content with memory-holing unassailable facts about Neil Tyson’s history of fabricating quotes (part 1, part 2, and part 3), are now trying to completely erase The Federalist from Wikipedia. Seriously, take a look:

Wikipedia The Federalist Censored

The deletion demand was made on Friday morning by user “Cwobeel,” who claimed that The Federalist “does not pass the threshold for notability.” The same user ironically describes himself in his Wikipedia profile as “a member of the Association of Inclusionist Wikipedians.”

Really? The Federalist doesn’t pass the threshold for notability? If The Federalist doesn’t pass that threshold, it’s hard to imagine who does. Our work has been regularly featured by literally every single major publication, site, and cable news outlet in the U.S., including the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Politico, The Daily Beast, Huffington Post, Real Clear Politics, the Drudge Report, Slate, Daily Caller, Salon, Washington Examiner, Free Beacon, Vox, National Review, Weekly Standard, Forbes, Think Progress, The Blaze, and so on. I could go on, and on, and on. We’ve interviewed politicians, major authors, and even cultural icons like Dave Barry and David Mamet. We’ve been on Fox News and MSNBC and CNN. Senators ask us to publish their columns. Likely presidential candidates sit down for interviews with us.

Our reach, influence, and impact are undeniable.

Unless, of course, you need to deny our existence in order to further the pretense that Neil Tyson is infallible. Because that’s what this is really about. You don’t burn books because they’re irrelevant. You burn books because you’re terrified that they’re not. You don’t muzzle people who have no audience. You muzzle people only when their voices are amplified far beyond your liking. As the famous baseball player Reggie Jackson said, “Fans don’t boo nobodies.”

When the Wikipedia censorship campaign began, the first salvo from its censorship cabal was to say that the claims against Tyson didn’t need to be mentioned because the sources of those claims weren’t reliable. It’s an odd accusation, seeing as how not a single person has produced evidence that President George W. Bush ever said what Tyson said he said. But it made a sick sort of sense: if you hate the message, just shoot the messenger.

Honestly, that was all fine by me. Wikipedia’s censorship campaign only brought more attention to the issue of Neil Tyson’s quote fabrications. The readership of our series of articles on Tyson dwarfs that of any single Wiki page by many, many orders of magnitude. In my opinion, the censorship campaign is important because it highlights how the progressive Left acts when challenged. Revise, don’t report. Erase, don’t acknowledge. Delete, don’t debate. The whole episode perfectly demonstrated that the so-called reality-based community is at war with reality.

This attempt to completely eliminate any mention whatsoever of The Federalist on Wikipedia is laughable and beyond pathetic, but it’s exactly what you’d expect from a group of delusional dimwits who have convinced themselves that justice consists entirely of just hitting the delete key over and over again. It’s cute when toddlers close their eyes and believe that nobody can see them, but when adults do it, it’s just sad.

But keep it up, Wikipedia. Keep up the fiction that if you just burn enough books, all will be made well. Keep up the fiction that your censorship will make this issue go away, rather than just fueling the fire. Keep reminding people why Wikipedia should never, ever be trusted to provide the facts on any topic that is even remotely controversial. Keep disappearing facts and evidence you don’t like while desperately clinging to the science fiction that you totally love facts and evidence.

You can’t win. If you strike us down, we’ll become more powerful than you can possibly imagine.

Photo by Shutterstock
Sean Davis is the co-founder of The Federalist.
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