OSHA Isn’t Tracking COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects Because It Doesn’t Want To Undermine Biden’s Shot Campaign

OSHA Isn’t Tracking COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects Because It Doesn’t Want To Undermine Biden’s Shot Campaign

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is not requiring companies to report any of their employees’ potentially damaging side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine because the regulatory agency doesn’t want to hamper the Biden administration’s vaccine campaign.

“DOL and OSHA, as well as other federal agencies, are working diligently to encourage COVID-19 vaccinations,” the OSHA website states. “As a result, OSHA will not enforce 29 CFR 1904’s recording requirements to require any employers to record worker side effects from COVID-19 vaccination…”

Under OSHA’s current COVID-19 Emergency Temporary Standard for Healthcare, businesses are not required to report their workers’ adverse effects to the jab because “OSHA does not wish to have any appearance of discouraging workers from receiving COVID-19 vaccination, and also does not wish to disincentivize employers’ vaccination efforts.”

This provision will not only allow potentially harmful side effects of the COVID-19 shot to go unnoticed and unrecorded but is scheduled to remain in place until at least May 2022.

“We will reevaluate the agency’s position at that time to determine the best course of action moving forward,” OSHA states on its website. It is unclear if this policy will be modified when the agency presents its pending vaccine rule forcing private companies with 100 or more employees to mandate the shot.

OSHA does, however, provide reporting procedures for employees who feel they “are being exposed to a serious health or safety hazard” such as COVID-19.

Just last week, OSHA admitted that it might rely on tattletales within companies to speed up its enforcement of President Joe Biden’s currently unenforceable directive pressuring private sector businesses to mandate the COVID-19 shot for employees. While the details of the rule are still under private review by the White House, OSHA told Bloomberg that “when necessary, OSHA has several methods to hold employers accountable for the safety and health of their workers” and will investigate and punish those businesses that fail to comply with the pending order based on reporting from workers at non-compliant companies.

Jordan Boyd is a staff writer at The Federalist. She graduated from Baylor University where she majored in political science and minored in journalism.
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