Fairfax Public Schools Suggested Video: ‘I Feel Safe When There Are No Police’

Fairfax Public Schools Suggested Video: ‘I Feel Safe When There Are No Police’

A summer “Learning Guide” published by Fairfax County Public Schools in Northern Virginia is teaching anti-police rhetoric to second graders. According to a whistleblower’s copy published by Parents Defending Education, this year’s guide promotes a video from “Woke Kindergarten” that claims, “I feel safe when there are no police.” 

Under a list of “suggested texts,” the six-page document recommends YouTube videos by Ki, the creator of “Woke Kindergarten.” The first “suggested” video is entitled “Safe by Ki (Woke Kindergarten 60 second text).” It starts by saying, “We all deserve to feel safe.” However, the video quickly becomes political. 

“I feel safe when I’m with my dogs. I feel safe when I’m with my partner. I feel safe when I’m with my friends. I feel safe when people listen to my feelings. I feel safe when there are no police,” the video says. It attempts to normalize anti-police rhetoric, by telling impressionable young children that it’s just as reasonable to feel safe around dogs as it is to feel “unsafe” around police.

“It’s no one’s job to tell me how I feel,” the video concludes. “But it’s everyone’s job to make sure that people who are being treated unfairly feel safe too.”

As the narrator speaks, the video shows young protesters holding signs that say, “Racism Isn’t Born, It’s Taught” and “Black Lives Matter,” a reference to the leftist organization connected to rioters who attacked and destroyed businesses across America last summer. 

Protest

Fairfax County Public Schools’ summer learning guide also suggests a second video, called “Good Trouble by Ki (Woke Kindergarten 60 second text).” This video tells young children, “Sometimes it’s good to get into trouble. It’s good when you are protecting your friends. It’s good when you are showing that you care about people’s lives.” 

It also displays an image of anti-gun rights “March For Our Lives” protestors, implying that it’s okay for kids to break the law if they’re supporting left-wing movements. The video invokes the legacy of civil rights leader John Lewis, in an attempt to suggest that the civil rights movement of the 1960s is analogous to today’s left-wing politicking. 

“…Necessary change has to happen, in order for Black and Indigenous people to be free. Which is why [John Lewis] kept getting into good trouble, until he couldn’t anymore,” the video claims. “Now it’s our turn. We can get into good trouble.”

Parents Defending Education points out, “Some critics have noted that the concept of ‘good trouble’ is confusing for second graders as they are also being taught, ‘I feel safe when there are no police.’” Not only are second graders being taught that law enforcement is evil, but they’re also being implicitly encouraged to break the law. 

According to Woke Kindergarten’s own website, pushing leftism is exactly the point of these videos. Woke Kindergarten creator Ki self-describes as an ardent radical. “Ki (they/them) is an abolitionist early educator, coach, consultant and creative entrepreneur currently innovating ways to unlearn, heal, liberate and create with their pedagogy, Woke Kindergarten,” Ki’s bio says. The website also touts a “commitment to abolitionist early education and pro-Black liberation.”

The language of “abolitionist” suggests Woke Kindergarten is dedicated to eradicating America’s law enforcement. The site’s “Woke Wonderings” page displays a series of infographics, which gear anti-police rhetoric toward children.

“If we abolished the police, what else could we do to keep people in the world safe?” one image asks, unintentionally acknowledging that police do, indeed, keep people safe. “Abolish means to get rid of for good,” another image says. “When we abolish something, we stop it from existing.” 

Woke Kindergarten also publishes “Woke Read Alouds” for small children, as well as “woke words” of the day like “protest” and “abolish.”

This is the organization whose materials are being recommended to Virginia children. Parents are sending their tax dollars — and more importantly, their children — to Fairfax County Public Schools, whose summer reading materials encourage students to defy the law and fear those who serve in blue. And this is just the latest, as critical race theory persists in American schools. 

Audrey Unverferth is an intern at The Federalist and a senior at the University of Chicago, where she studies Law, Letters, and Society and Russian and East European Studies. She is also the co-founder, publisher, and editor-in-chief of the Chicago Thinker. Follow her on Twitter @audrey__unver or email [email protected]
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