After Censoring Hunter Biden Bombshell Over ‘Hacked Materials Policy,’ Twitter Is Silent On Hacked Tax Info

After Censoring Hunter Biden Bombshell Over ‘Hacked Materials Policy,’ Twitter Is Silent On Hacked Tax Info

While Twitter was quick to censor a bombshell Hunter Biden New York Post report prior to the 2020 presidential election due to it supposedly violating the “hacked materials policy,” the social media giant has yet to take any action on the leaked ProPublica report Tuesday on confidential tax information.

Federal tax data illegally obtained by ProPublica and published on Tuesday shows tax data for billionaires such as Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Tesla CEO Elon Musk, and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. ProPublica found that the billionaires’ federal income taxes from 2014 to 2018 amounted to about 3.4 percent of their public net worth.

ProPublica has not said where it received the documents. White House press secretary Jen Psaki and Treasury Department spokeswoman Lily Adams indicated shortly after the report was published that the action was “illegal,” and the IRS, Treasury Department, and FBI will be performing an investigation.

“The matter is being referred to the Office of the Inspector General, Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the US Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia, all of whom have independent authority to investigate,” Adams said in a statement.

As of this writing, Twitter has not made any public comment on whether the report violates its hacked policy and has not blocked links to the report. A spokesman for the company did not immediately respond to The Federalist’s request for comment.

In the run-up to the 2020 presidential election between Donald Trump and Joe Biden, Twitter censored all links to the New York Post’s story outlining several of the Biden son’s scandalous emails. Communications showed that Hunter set up a meeting between then-Vice President Joe Biden and a leading executive at a Ukrainian energy firm.

Twitter claimed after its decision to block link-sharing that not doing so could “incentivize” hacking of documents, ignoring the evidence indicating the laptop had not been “hacked.”

“We didn’t want Twitter to be a distributor for hacked materials,” said Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in October 2020 at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing. “We found that the New York Post — because it showed the direct materials, screenshots of the direct materials, and it was unclear how those were obtained — that it fell under this policy.”

It was not until November 2020 that Dorsey acknowledged it was “wrong” to censor the report. He noted in a Senate Judiciary Committee, “We made a quick interpretation using no other evidence that the materials in the article were obtained through hacking, and according to our policy, we blocked them from being spread,” Dorsey testified. “Upon further consideration, we admitted this action was wrong and corrected it within 24 hours.”

This is not the first time Twitter has contradicted its purported “hacked materials policy.” Last month, the platform allowed an article based on hacked information to circulate in its “trending” section. The article targeted law enforcement who donated to a fund supporting an officer who was eventually cleared of wrongdoing for the shooting of Jacob Blake.

Gabe Kaminsky is a senior contributor to The Federalist. His writing has appeared in RealClearPolitics, The American Conservative, the American Mind, the New York Post, and other outlets. Follow him on Twitter @Gabe__Kaminsky and email tips to [email protected]
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