Joe Biden Claims Bolivia Is On The Border Of Venezuela. It’s Not

Joe Biden Claims Bolivia Is On The Border Of Venezuela. It’s Not

Democratic presidential frontrunner and former Vice President Joe Biden claimed last month that millions of Venezuelans were flooding into Bolivia.

“Look at what’s going on in Venezuela right now… Millions of people are crossing the border destabilizing Bolivia,” Biden said in a meeting with the Des Moines Register editorial board.

There’s just one problem: Bolivia is far from Venezuela. In fact, Bolivia is on the opposite side of the continent, south of neighboring Brazil as seen in the map below.

The country Biden was likely referring to was Colombia, arguing in his meeting with the editorial board that he played a key role in reforming the South American nation.

“I’m the guy that put together a plan in Columbia,” Biden said.

Since Venezuela has begun to drown in a socialist crisis suffering from extreme food shortages and political unrest, the United Nations has reported that more than four million refugees have fled the country. Colombia has seen the largest share of refugees fleeing the Venezuelan crisis with more than 1.3 million people entering its borders.

Biden’s latest mix-up is far from the first time Biden has confused his geography, raising further doubts about the former vice president’s sharpness and ability to take on President Donald Trump this fall.

At an Iowa fish-fry in November, Biden referred to the Hawkeye State as Ohio. When speaking to reporters on a trip to New Hampshire in August, Biden said he was in Vermont. During a California fundraiser in the same month, Biden offered sympathy for the victims of back-to-back shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio but referred to them as the “tragic events in Houston today and also in Michigan the day before.”

[Read a running list of Joe Biden’s best slip-ups here]

Despite a year of campaign slip-ups, Biden’s support has remained resilient in national polls leading the crowded field of candidates with 29 percent support. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders fall behind to a distant second with just more than 20 percent in Real Clear Politics’ latest aggregate of polls.

While Biden has seen his support dip in Iowa and New Hampshire, the first two contest states of the Democratic primary, he holds a comfortable lead in the two states to follow, South Carolina and Nevada.

Tristan Justice is a staff writer at The Federalist focusing on the 2020 presidential campaigns. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at [email protected]
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