Women Are Not Too Stupid Or Emotional To Bypass Evidence When Considering Assault Allegations

Women Are Not Too Stupid Or Emotional To Bypass Evidence When Considering Assault Allegations

Women are not so morally craven that we need to punish some politically convenient scapegoat for the sins of completely different men. That's not justice.
Joy Pullmann
By

I am a woman, and I don’t think with my genitals.

I am a woman, and I don’t vote with my genitals, either.

I am a woman, and I don’t need to declare that fact to validate my ideas.

I am a woman, and I am able to consider evidence and ideas without using my sex as a shield for weak thinking, or an excuse for reprehensible behavior.

I am a woman, and just because I’ll never be able to bench press what just about every man can, doesn’t mean I need to take refuge in magical thinking, lies, smears, and identity politics. Women can think just as smart, fast, and hard as men, and I can do it while nursing and gestating new human beings. That’s a woman’s own unique glory, and I’ll stand it against bench pressing any day of the week.

I don’t need people to tell me that because I am a woman the standards of evidence are lower for my claims.

I don’t need people to tell me that because I am a woman I have an excuse for table-turning temper tantrums when I don’t get what I want out of politics, relationships, or anything else. I can rise to just the same standards men can. I welcome a friendly competition towards the highest bar, not the worst betrayal. Women are better than that. We are not just the survivors, but the invalidators of the left’s bigotry of low expectations.

I can think, I ought to think, and I will think, and nobody can stop me no matter how hard or long they chant brainless, anti-fact, woman-demeaning slogans like “Believe all women” and “I believe her” and “Yes all women.”

I don’t need slogans. I don’t need marches. I don’t need a vulgar pink hat. I don’t need abortion, and I don’t need to wallow in self-pitying victimhood so the great white government can swoop in and rescue poor little helpless me.

I want the truth. I want justice. Getting those requires due process. It means the presumption of innocence, the ability to face one’s accusers in a court of law, the ability to present evidence and speak on one’s own behalf. It means weighing evidence, not “credibility” or “believability” or, heaven save me, “passion.” It means setting aside my biases to weigh claims based on the facts at hand.

I’m not fooled into believing whatever is the social manipulation du jour because people show me images of crying, shouting, emotion-drunk people marching here and there wearing crazy costumes and carrying ridiculous signs. I’m not anti-emotion, because emotions are real and human. I’m anti-hysteria, and of framing women as hysterical. What’s hysteria? Emotions completely out of touch with reality. We shouldn’t validate hysteria, we should tell hysterics to sober up.

Because I think I should earn my credibility, rather than have it handed to me because I fit somebody’s identity politics image slot as a useful idiot, I’ve actually read some books and learned some history. I know what good comes from mobs out for “slitting the throats of their enemies.” That’s not the country I want for myself, for my children, or for anyone.

And I am sick, utterly sick, of people telling me that because I am a woman I get to have whatever I want so long as I cry or scream about it long and loud enough. I am better than that. I am smarter than that. I am wiser than that. All women can be.

Women are not so morally craven that we need to punish some politically convenient scapegoat for the sins of completely different men. That’s not justice. Don’t put that blood on my hands, or on the hands of women as a collective. We want no part in this political lynching of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh — except as the unshakable defenders of truth.

We are not the mob, we are the defenders of truth, justice, and our nation’s integrity. In this effort we gladly take the hands and stand at the sixes of all people, men and women, who will stand up and be our allies, or stand in need of our aid.

We gladly stand up for those denied the opportunity to defend themselves in a court of law, and hauled out to prove a negative to a purposefully prejudiced court of public opinion. We gladly stand up to preserve the standards for justice we want used for any allegation that might one day be leveled against our own husbands, brothers, fathers, and sons.

These are women who deserve the name, who represent our sex at its finest, the way we should all want to be known — not as people whose minds are too weak to be used robustly, whose emotions are too strong to be controlled, and who use those who have suffered horrible crimes as human shields for an evil political attack. We are women, not a caricature of women, and we stand with Brett Kavanaugh.

Joy Pullmann is executive editor of The Federalist, mother of five children, and author of "The Education Invasion: How Common Core Fights Parents for Control of American Kids," from Encounter Books. Her latest ebook is a list of more than 200 recommended classic books for children ages 3-7 and their parents. Find her on Twitter @JoyPullmann.

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