Abortion CEOs Say Ending Lives For Profit Is ‘Just No Fun Anymore’

Abortion CEOs Say Ending Lives For Profit Is ‘Just No Fun Anymore’

The abortion rate hasn’t been lower since abortion was legalized in 1973, and we're seeing more pro-life legislation than ever before.

“Get out of bed, Betty.” That’s what the Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky CEO, Betty Cockrum, now tells herself every morning. She tells the left-leaning student newspaper at Indiana University, “You got to talk to yourself to even get out of bed right now, and we do.”

I think it’s safe to say the mood of the abortion industry is total misery. Cockrum says, “When your fellow CEOs say, ‘It’s just no fun anymore. It just gets harder by the day,’ that’s tough.”

What I’d like to know is, what was “fun?” Was killing 58 million innocent boys and girls since the Supreme Court legalized abortion “fun?” Was making billions off the mothers who thought their lives would go back to normal after an abortion “fun?” When was abortion ever fun?

Planned Parenthood and its allies are in a post-election hangover. They’re “really stressed” about Donald Trump in the White House. But it wouldn’t have mattered who won the election. Hillary may have bought them a little more time of state-sanctioned favor, but abortion is on its way out. Certainly, it can’t happen fast enough—not for the approximately 3,000 little boys and girls who are losing their lives today. But abortion is on the decline.

Abortion Is Declining, Especially Among Young People

Last month, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported that annual abortions in the U.S. dropped by 5 percent from the previous year. The abortion rate hasn’t been lower since before the Supreme Court legalized abortion in 1973.

In Indiana, where Planned Parenthood’s Cockrum oversees the state’s largest abortion business, abortions have steadily declined for seven consecutive years. Abortions there are less than half of the all-time high number of 16,505 in 1980. But still in 2015, Planned Parenthood’s Indiana abortion facilities ended the lives of 5,234 children.

Pro-life laws are passing at a record pace. According to pro-abortion Guttmacher Institute, states passed almost as many pro-life laws in the past five years as they had in the previous 15 years combined. Indiana governor and Vice President-Elect Mike Pence signed his own fair share of pro-life bills into law.

Abortion is losing its favor in the court of public opinion, especially among millennials—and even the abortion industry knows it.

“The biggest challenge reproduction rights advocates face is the generational gap,” a Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky Vice President admitted.

This Work Won’t Be ‘Fun’ Ever Again

The abortion industry is in a slump. Sorry, Betty, but it’s never going to be “fun” again. The good news I can offer to those in the abortion industry who can hardly get out of bed in the morning, is that they don’t have to stay in an industry that fights for the death of innocents.

Dr. Bernard Nathanson, who co-founded NARAL and aborted 75,000 children, left the industry and became a pro-life advocate. Dr. Anthony Levatino did 1,200 abortions before recognizing the humanity of the unborn. He now changes hearts and minds by explaining what happens in an abortion procedure. Former Planned Parenthood director, Abby Johnson, has helped hundreds of abortion workers leave the industry with her ministry, And Then There Were None.

As we approach Christmas, Christians remember the Christ child who was hated, even as a baby. (Remember the mass infanticide in Bethlehem?) While the world is filled with hate, let us on the pro-life side respond with love.

In this time of Advent, as we prepare for Christmas, I have my own phrase I’m telling myself each morning: “Get out of bed, Becky, and pray for Betty.”

Join me in praying for the CEOs of the abortion industry and all abortion workers. May their cloud of misery turn to joy when they realize they don’t have to keep fighting for death. May they one day get out of bed each morning and fight for every child to safely get out of the womb.

Becky Rogness is owner of Rogness Communications, a small business specializing in public relations for pro-life policy makers and non-profit organizations. A former Capitol Hill staffer, Rogness lives in Minnesota with her husband and two children.
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