Delaware Proposal Would Let Kindergarteners ‘Choose’ Their Sex And Race

Delaware Proposal Would Let Kindergarteners ‘Choose’ Their Sex And Race

When I was a young mother and let my kids listen to the Little Teapot song, it never occurred to me that they might question whether they could actually be short, stout kitchen utensils with handles and spouts. Granted, on several occasions they did get all steamed up and shout. But they were kids. They knew who they were. Thankfully, they suffered no identity crises. We were fortunate.

Apparently that’s not the case for a new generation in the great state of Delaware. There, if the state legislature passes Regulation 225, school children as young as five will be allowed to choose their own race and sex. And parents will have no say in the matter. In fact, schools won’t even have to inform the parents of their children’s choices.

If passed, this regulation will allow Delaware’s public-school children to decide from day to day whether they are male or female (or, no doubt, something else if the trend continues) and use the restrooms and locker rooms of their momentary choosing. According to Mark Purpura, president of Equality Delaware, all this is necessary because of “children living in fear who do not feel comfortable coming out to their parents as gay or transgender.”

So, if the measure passes, 90-plus percent of students—those who have no problem comprehending the obvious—will have to forego their rights in order to accommodate the perceived rights of a tiny minority—1.7 percent who are homosexual and .03 percent who identify as transgender—who can’t or won’t grasp the easily discernable facts available to anyone with functioning vision and no political agenda.

The measure would even allow kids to decide their race. I suppose that if, while he was still quite young, my son had pretended to be Navin the cat juggler, my husband and I might have indulged his imagination as long as we were confident that he saw his play as fantasy. But if he’d announced to us in genuine sincerity that he really was “born a poor black child,” we’d have had to have set him straight. Mind you, we’d have had no issue with him wanting to be black, but we would have been deeply concerned with his inability to differentiate between truth and fiction.

Ultimately, that is the deepest issue this bill in Delaware raises. Truth is at stake. If the sensible majority acquiesces to the delusional minority, our nation will have taken one more giant step toward becoming a post-truth culture. As President John F. Kennedy said, “The goal of education is the advancement of knowledge and the dissemination of truth.” Truth is. It is for us to discover and treasure, not for us to make up for ourselves.

I am not a teapot and I never will be, but these seemingly endless efforts by radical change agents to redefine reality are starting to get me all steamed up and ready to shout.

Denise Shick is author of “My Daddy’s Secret,” “When Hope Seems Lost,” and “Understanding Gender Confusion.” She serves on the academic council of the International Children's Rights Institute and directs Help 4 Families Ministry.
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