Keep Your Man Parts Out Of My Bathroom

Keep Your Man Parts Out Of My Bathroom

North Carolina’s elected officials have made a stand for women’s rights by passing a new law requiring people to use the bathrooms and locker rooms designated for their biological sex.
D.C. McAllister
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The North Carolina General Assembly is making a stand against an invasive ordinance the city of Charlotte passed, which would allow transgender people to use any bathroom they choose. That means if a man says he identifies as a woman, he’s free to use the ladies’ restroom, even if he still does it standing up.

The Charlotte ordinance was supposed to take effect April 1, but the House voted 83-25 to strike it down, preventing all local governments from passing these kinds of anti-privacy laws. It also requires schools, agencies, and public college campuses to only allow people to use bathrooms according to their biological sex.

Following the House vote, the NC Senate passed the bill 32-0, with all Democrats refusing to vote. The bill went to Gov. Pat McCrory to be signed, which he did late Wednesday.

LGBT activists are furious. They’re presenting this as a civil rights issue, even though no one is being denied bathroom use. Even politically conservative Caitlyn Jenner is chiming in, urging people to take action:

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Convicted Pedophile Pimps Bathroom Access

Opponents of the bathroom ordinance are praising the state government for protecting women from potential harm. While many transgender people pose no physical threat, the fact is sexual predators cannot be distinguished from other males because all a man has to say is “I identify as a woman” to use the bathroom. There is simply no way to weed out the true transgender person from those who aren’t.

While many transgender people pose no physical threat, the fact is sexual predators cannot be distinguished from other males.

One point that is particularly disturbing about the Charlotte ordinance is that the man who helped found the bathroom bill is a convicted pedophile and registered sex offender. This set off a firestorm throughout the city as residents protested the ordinance’s passage, but the city pushed it through anyway—all in the name of tolerance and compassion.

As it stands now, without the ordinance, if a man is found in a women’s bathroom, he can be asked to leave and removed. If the ordinance were to go into effect, women and girls would no longer have any protection from a man who wants to lurk in the bathroom. The days of sending our daughters into the “ladies’ room” alone would be a thing of the past because it’s no longer assumed to be a safe space.

The NC General Assembly recognized the danger of the Charlotte ordinance and exercised its right as the higher authority to squelch a local law that would create a public safety issue. Some have said this is an overreach by the state government, but when it comes to the safety of North Carolina citizens, it is the state’s responsibility to overturn local ordinances that put citizens at risk.

“When any local government goes so far as to not protect the privacy rights of folks, then the General Assembly will in fact step in,” House Speaker Tim Moore said.

Who Cares About Women, Right?

The NC governor released the following statement after signing the bill:

The basic expectation of privacy in the most personal of settings, a restroom or locker room, for each gender was violated by government overreach and intrusion by the mayor and city council of Charlotte. This radical breach of trust and security under the false argument of equal access not only impacts the citizens of Charlotte but people who come to Charlotte to work, visit or play. This new government regulation defies common sense and basic community norms by allowing, for example, a man to use a woman’s bathroom, shower or locker room.

While local municipalities have important priorities working to oversee police, fire, water and sewer, zoning, roads, and transit, the mayor and city council took action far out of its core responsibilities. As a result, I have signed legislation passed by a bipartisan majority to stop this breach of basic privacy and etiquette which was to go into effect April 1. Although other items included in this bill should have waited until regular session, this bill does not change existing rights under state or federal law.

It is now time for the city of Charlotte elected officials and state elected officials to get back to working on the issues most important to our citizens.

Dean Arp, a Republican representative from Union County, said, “All North Carolina citizens expect bodily privacy in showers, locker rooms and bathrooms.” One of the Democrats who opposed the bill said Charlotte “must not allow fear mongering and discrimination against others.”

“In Mecklenburg County we tried really hard to be inclusive and to accept everyone,” Rep. Trisha Cotham said. “Now we are having this special session that is a waste of taxpayer dollars and it just strips cities and towns of their rights.”

The privacy rights of women and girls don’t seem to concern Cotham or activists in the LGBT community who are calling this bill “pro-discrimination” and “anti-LGBT.” They’re only concerned about what they perceive as “discrimination.” But there’s nothing discriminatory about saying you have to use the bathroom that correlates with your biological sex. No transgender person is being denied access to a toilet.

Feelings Don’t Always Tell the Truth

Yet this is what the militant LGBT community does in the name of tolerance. It runs roughshod over the rights and safety of others to advance their delusions. It doesn’t matter that letting men into a girls’ bathroom simply because he feels like a woman puts women at risk. They just don’t care. They only care about their perceived rights, not real rights. They only care about their feelings.

They are willing to allow a girl to possibly be raped or molested just so a handful of men can pee in the ladies’ restroom.

This is what we hear from those pushing this dangerous ordinance. “But what about the feelings of transgender people?” Feelings aren’t the basis of law, and feelings don’t determine what is real and what is true. While it is certainly tragic that some people struggle with gender identity, what they need is help working through those psychological issues, not laws to perpetuate their delusions, especially when those laws violate the rights and safety of others.

The LGBT community and the ACLU are demanding that the NC bill, which protects women, be condemned. What needs to be condemned are people who care nothing about the stability and safety of their fellow citizens. They care only about their own feelings and their own militant agenda—to hell with everyone else. Even as they whine about intolerance, they are proving to be the most intolerant of all.

Just think about it. They are willing to allow a girl to possibly be raped or molested just so a handful of men can pee in the ladies’ restroom. That’s not a civil right. That’s sick.

Denise C. McAllister is a journalist based in Charlotte, North Carolina, and a senior contributor to The Federalist. Follow her on Twitter @McAllisterDen.
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