Merriam-Webster Thought Police Just Changed The Definition Of ‘Anti-Vaxxer’ To Attack Opponents Of Government Mandates

Merriam-Webster Thought Police Just Changed The Definition Of ‘Anti-Vaxxer’ To Attack Opponents Of Government Mandates

Merriam-Webster expanded the definition of the word “anti-vaxxer” to encompass people who do not believe government bureaucrats have the authority to force shot mandates on individuals.

According to Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary, the definition for the popular abbreviation of “anti-vaccine” not only describes “a person who opposes the use of vaccines” but also anyone who opposes “regulations mandating vaccination.”

“He said, while he will not get the COVID-19 vaccine, he is not an ‘anti-vaxxer’ against all vaccinations,” one of the examples listed in the online definition stated.

Another example claims that “some self-identified anti-vaxxers are vehemently against all vaccines” while “some are skeptical of specific vaccines.”

The term, the dictionary site explained, especially applies to “a parent who opposes having his or her child vaccinated.”

Previous versions of the “anti-vaxxer” webpage suggest that the word used to be defined as “a person who opposes vaccination or laws that mandate vaccination.” (emphasis added). It wasn’t until sometime on Oct. 4, the same day that U.S. officials outlined specific instructions for all federal employees to comply with President Joe Biden’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for government workers, that Merriam-Webster swapped the word “laws” for “regulations.”

Merriam-Webster did not immediately respond to The Federalist’s request for comment.

The quiet switch also comes on the heels of Biden’s basically unenforceable and nonexistent vaccine mandate for private businesses that employ 100 or more employees. As The Federalist’s Joy Pullmann noted:

The White House, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the Department of Labor haven’t released any official guidance for the alleged mandate. There is no executive order. There’s nothing but press statements.

Despite what you may have been falsely led to believe by the media fantasy projection machine, press statements have exactly zero legal authority.

Jordan Davidson is a staff writer at The Federalist. She graduated from Baylor University where she majored in political science and minored in journalism.
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