Talentless Alec Baldwin Mourns Cuomo’s ‘Tragic’ Resignation

Talentless Alec Baldwin Mourns Cuomo’s ‘Tragic’ Resignation

Entitled actor Alec Baldwin lamented his buddy Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s resignation, calling the move a “tragic” moment for New York.

“Regardless of what you think of Cuomo, this is a tragic day,” Baldwin tweeted on Tuesday. “Party politics in this country draw ambitious but ultimately isolated, even socially maladjusted men and women who, given the current cancel culture, will likely have their shortcomings exposed and magnified.”

Baldwin, who plays Donald Trump on “Saturday Night Live’s” comedy skits, previously called the former president a “sexual predator,” expressing his frustration that “There’s nothing you can do about that. You cannot touch [people in power].”

Apparently that standard applies only to Baldwin’s political adversaries. Last week, New York Attorney General Letitia James’s office released report findings that Cuomo sexually harassed 11 women, breaking numerous state and federal laws in the process. After the news broke, Baldwin shifted his tune, railing against cancel culture and sympathizing with serial harasser Cuomo.

After backlash, Baldwin took to Instagram to clarify that he was not trying to “minimize Cuomo’s actions regarding sexual harassment.” Instead, he wrote, “I meant to suggest that nearly all power politicians are isolated, in the extreme, from reality.”

Baldwin, who was once arrested for physical assault and harassment himself over a dispute about a parking spot, once got kicked off a plane for refusing to pocket his cell phone, and allegedly called his 11-year-old daughter a “thoughtless little pig,” has a surplus of shortcomings himself. But Cuomo’s latest scandal reveals more than an isolated shortcoming that dinged his reputation.

In March, Baldwin expressed distaste for cancel culture over Instagram.

“It’s like trolling,” he said. “It’s like a giant, mile-long net and you’re catching a lot of people, more than a few who deserve it, and more than a few who don’t. Or they don’t deserve to have their careers and their lives destroyed.”

Baldwin never specified what actions should constitute a ruined career — but if unwanted groping, kisses, hugs, and inappropriate comments don’t make the cut, what will?

Haley Strack is an intern at The Federalist and a student at Hillsdale College studying politics and journalism. Follow her on Twitter @StrackHaley or reach her at [email protected]
Photo Flickr
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