Utah Governor Defends Racism As Long As It’s Against White Kids

Utah Governor Defends Racism As Long As It’s Against White Kids

Utah Gov. Spencer Cox defended racism against white kids during a question and answer session with constituents on Thursday.

During the session, live-tweeted by the governor’s official Twitter account, one Utah citizen asked “if it’s racist that the Utah Jazz excludes white children from the team’s scholarship program.”

The program created by the NBA team allots a scholarship to a new “underrepresented student of color enrolling as a freshman for the 2021-22 school year” for every team win during the 2020-21 season basketball season. To qualify for the funds, students must have graduated from high school and be a “person of color.” Since the program’s start, the team has handed out nearly 50 full-ride scholarships to black and minority students only.

Despite the team’s deliberate exclusion of white students from the program, Cox said the scholarship requirements are not racist.

“It’s not racist. Ryan Smith and the Jazz can do what they want with their funds. All kids should have equal opportunities, and we’re proud of the Jazz,” he replied.

When asked if Cox believes that excluding white people from amenities, finances, and programs is racist, the governor’s office reiterated his former claim but said it did not apply to government scholarships.

“Gov. Cox believes the Utah Jazz has every right to act according to their own corporate values and issue scholarships to whomever they choose. Government scholarships, on the other hand, are not based on race,” a spokesperson from the governor’s office told The Federalist.

The Utah Jazz also did not respond to The Federalist’s request for comment.

In addition to his comments about racism during the question and answer session, Cox claimed, without evidence, that masks are still required in Utah schools because education facilities “had high transmission rates early in the pandemic.” Cox also told a citizen concerned about the governor’s amassed power during the pandemic that he doesn’t support “reining in executive powers — especially on health and safety issues.”

Jordan Davidson is a staff writer at The Federalist. She graduated from Baylor University where she majored in political science and minored in journalism.
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