Disney Fired Gina Carano Over A Nazi Comparison But Has No Problem With Chinese Concentration Camps

Disney Fired Gina Carano Over A Nazi Comparison But Has No Problem With Chinese Concentration Camps

According to the Walt Disney Company, making Holocaust analogies on social media is a fireable offense, but profiting off an ongoing modern-day genocide is A-OK. Disney-owned Lucasfilm fired “The Mandalorian” actress Gina Carano this week for posting a Nazi comparison on her Instagram.

“Jews were beaten in the streets, not by Nazi soldiers but by their neighbors … even by children,” Carano wrote. “Most people today don’t realize that to get to the point where Nazi soldiers could easily round up thousands of Jews, the government first made their own neighbors hate them simply for being Jews. How is that any different from hating someone for their political views.”

Lucasfilm told Variety Magazine that “her social media posts denigrating people based on their cultural and religious identities are abhorrent and unacceptable.” Yet the actual ongoing rounding up of people based on cultural and religious identities, not just words about it, has yet to be denounced by Lucasfilm’s parent organization.

The Disney company has remained silent when called out for filming its live-action “Mulan” movie in the same region that the Chinese Communist government is holding at least 1 million Uighurs, members of ethnic minorities, in concentration camps, according to the U.S. State Department. Disney even went as far as thanking the CCP and their propaganda departments in the credits of the film.

The Chinese agencies given a special shout-out from Disney are the very same bureaucracies telling the international press and the family members of enslaved Uighurs that they are merely being held in “training centers.” Multiple reports and Uighur activists have alleged that what actually happens in these “training centers” is not just indoctrination but detention, mass surveillance, forced sterilization, and even systemic rape, according to the BBC.

One woman interviewed by the BBC who was detained for 18 months in Xinjiang, the same region where several scenes in “Mulan” were filmed, described how she was forced to strip Uighur women naked and handcuff them.

“My job was to remove their clothes above the waist and handcuff them so they cannot move,” said Gulzira Auelkhan. “Then I would leave the women in the room and a man would enter — some Chinese man from outside or policeman. I sat silently next to the door, and when the man left the room I took the woman for a shower.”

This is just one example of numerous horrific reports to come out of the Xinjiang region. Other recent stories include U.S. Customs and Border Protection seizing 13 tons of beauty products made from prisoners’ hair and Uighur men blindfolded and handcuffed awaiting transport at a train station.

Apparently, these types of human rights violations are not a problem for Disney. There is too much money to be made in Chinese markets to offend the CCP. But should an outspoken conservative actress liken political speech censorship to what happened in Nazi Germany, well, that is where they draw the line.

Madeline Osburn is managing editor at The Federalist. Follow her on Twitter.
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