At South Carolina Rally, Kanye West Gives Emotional Speech On Abortion: ‘I Almost Killed My Daughter’

At South Carolina Rally, Kanye West Gives Emotional Speech On Abortion: ‘I Almost Killed My Daughter’

Kanye West continued his recently launched presidential campaign Sunday with a rally in Charleston, South Carolina, where he gave an emotional speech on his personal experiences with abortion. 

“My mom saved my life. My dad wanted to abort me. My mom saved my life. There would have been no Kanye West because my dad was too busy,” he said through tears. “I almost killed my daughter! I almost killed my daughter!”

West explained that he and his wife Kim Kardashian West had contemplated an abortion when they first became pregnant with their oldest daughter North, but had a change in heart. 

“I called my wife and she said, ‘We’re gonna have this baby.’ I said we’re gonna have this child … So even if my wife were to divorce me after this speech, she brought North into the world when I didn’t want to. She stood up and she protected that child,” he told his audience. 

While West did get emotional about his own personal experience with abortion, he clarified that he doesn’t believe it should be illegal and that people who choose to keep their babies should be paid. 

“My stance is not to make abortion illegal at all. It should always be legal. But there should be an option of maximum increase available,” he said. “Maximum increase would be, everybody that has a baby gets a million dollars.”

He also spoke out in support of single moms, blaming society for making it difficult for them. 

“It takes a village to raise a child,” he said. “Society has been set up for single moms to not have a village, to not have a child.”

In addition to abortion and parenthood, West talked to the crowd about his newfound faith and his belief that everyone is a part of “God’s people.”

“We are all equal in God’s eyes,” he said. “Sometimes people are controlled by demons. Sometimes people are controlled by the environment that we are in, but we are all God’s people, there [are] no bad people. There are lost people, but we are all God’s people.”

West also made some controversial comments about Harriet Tubman claiming that “she never actually freed the slaves, she just had them work for other white people.”

West previously faced backlash over his beliefs on slavery and Harriet Tubman. In 2018, West misquoted Tubman on Twitter after he made comments in a TMZ interview claiming that slavery was a choice. 

“I freed a thousand slaves I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves. – Harriet Tubman,” West said in a since deleted tweet. 

West’s rally in South Carolina comes as he continues to push for people to petition for his name on the 2020 presidential ballot, despite some past due filing deadlines. 

“Hi guys please sign up to put me on the ballot in South Carolina at any of these locations. You can also sign up at the website kanye2020.country,” he tweeted in an attempt to gain at least 10,000 signatures to join the South Carolina ballot. 

 

West first announced his run for President on July 4 in a tweet and later told Forbes in an exclusive interview that he’s “been talking about this for years.”

“We must now realize the promise of America by trusting God, unifying our vision and building our future. I am running for president of the United States 🇺🇸! #2020VISION,” he wrote. 

https://twitter.com/kanyewest/status/1279575273365594112?s=21

While he initially received support from some individuals including his wife and SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk, West remains vigilant in the struggle to move forward in his bid to land on the presidential ballot as a member of “the birthday party.”

 

 

 

Jordan Davidson is a staff writer at The Federalist. She graduated from Baylor University where she majored in political science and minored in journalism.
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