USA Today Pushes Nazi Symbol Conspiracy Theory To Go After Trump

USA Today Pushes Nazi Symbol Conspiracy Theory To Go After Trump

In the latest illustration that Trump Derangement Syndrome has broken legacy media, USA Today, otherwise known as Free Pictures Of The News And Articles Written In Crayon, issued a “fact-check” asserting the Trump campaign’s use of an eagle on memorabilia features imagery of Nazi Germany.

“President Donald Trump’s campaign website recently unveiled a T-shirt that has come under fire because of design similarities between its logo and a Nazi symbol,” said the “fact check,” going on to explain the comparisons were first made by a Jewish progressive group and the Lincoln Project, an organization of NeverTrump Republicans promoting a radical Democratic presidential nominee.

“The claims that a Trump campaign T-shirt has come under criticism for using a symbol similar to a Nazi eagle is TRUE,” the paper concluded, even after acknowledging the eagle’s use as a longtime emblem of American patriotism embedded in governmental seals for more than 200 years, long pre-dating its use by the Nazis.

The hysterical, ahistorical conclusion drew immediate mockery on Twitter, with some poking fun at its previous illustration of “chainsaw bayonets” as a possible gun modification.

Others highlighted the eagle featuring a prominent presence in Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s wardrobe, which even drew the adoration of the paper when she wore if during the Trump impeachment proceedings.

Trump campaign Communications Director Tim Murtaugh slammed USA Today’s blind rating as “moronic.”

“In Democrats’ America, Mount Rushmore glorifies white supremacy and the bald eagle with an American flag is a Nazi symbol. They have lost their minds,” Murtaugh wrote on Twitter.”

The backlash prompted the paper to release a “clarification” on Twitter noting “the eagle is a longtime US symbol, too.”

In fact, while used in the United States as the national bird since 1782, the eagle symbol’s use as an emblem of patriotic unity goes back even further, to at least the ancient Romans.

Tristan Justice is a staff writer at The Federalist focusing on the 2020 presidential campaigns. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at [email protected]
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