In Midst Of Wuhan Virus Crisis, Fake USDA Employee Threatens Lawyer Who Criticized Government On Twitter

In Midst Of Wuhan Virus Crisis, Fake USDA Employee Threatens Lawyer Who Criticized Government On Twitter

On Monday, someone who claimed to be an employee of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) threatened an attorney who questioned the government’s constitutional authority to impose new sweeping restrictions on everyday life in an effort to curb the Wuhan coronavirus epidemic.

“If you are not already obsessed with your Constitutional rights, this is a good time to become so,” wrote attorney Marc Randazza on Twitter. “They [government] make power grabs during times of crisis.”

Robert Caruso, who has a long history of fabricating his resume and falsely identified as a USDA employee in his Twitter bio, shot back unsolicited and threatened to quarantine and starve those who criticize the government’s response to the pandemic.

“This is happening, whether you like it or now,” Caruso wrote. “There will be curfews, freedom of assembly restricted, and – boy, it was not wise to snap at me – if it gets really bad, food will be rationed. Take a wild guess which department would ration the food.”

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Caruso however, was found out to be lying about his own employment once again despite being verified with a blue checkmark on Twitter.

“The individual is not an employee of the U.S. Department of Agriculture,” an agency spokesperson told The Federalist. “The account has been flagged for Twitter, and the user has already removed USDA as his employer on his profile. The U.S. supply chains remain strong and our food supply is abundant. Any reports of rationing are false.”

Texas Republican Congressman Chip Roy blasted Caruso on Twitter, demanding the power-hungry fake bureaucrat to surrender from making the starvation threats.

“Guess what, Robert – Article I pays your bills,” Roy wrote before the USDA revealed Caruso was no employee of theirs. “Back off your bureaucratic high-horse chief. This is not what public service is about.”

As of Tuesday afternoon, the Wuhan coronavirus has infected almost 200,000 people worldwide and more than 5,000 in the United States which is believed to be far higher than recorded given the lack of testing that has occurred. More than 7,500 people around the globe have died from the virus with 48 fatalities in the U.S.

To prevent the spread of infection from overwhelming hospitals that experts say are not equipped to handle the inevitable caseload, President Donald Trump has urged Americans nationwide not to gather in groups of more than 10 people on the advice of White House health officials.

As the country grapples with the epidemic, states and localities are closing schools and restaurants to prevent the spread, and Bay Area residents in California are the first to be ordered to “shelter in place.”

Tristan Justice is a staff writer at The Federalist focusing on the 2020 presidential campaigns. Follow him on Twitter at @JusticeTristan or contact him at [email protected]
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