The Best Tweets Of Democrats’ South Carolina Primary Debate

The Best Tweets Of Democrats’ South Carolina Primary Debate

From Las Vegas to Charleston in a week: Democratic candidates for president had to spin from pretending to care about unionized casino workers to pretending to care about rural black Southerners.

From Las Vegas to Charleston in a week: Democratic candidates for president had to spin from pretending to care about unionized casino workers to pretending to care about rural black Southerners. It’s quite a journey, but it’s all a part of the last debate before the South Carolina primary and then Super Tuesday.

Didn’t watch? Don’t worry about it. We’ve captured all of the yelling, shouting and hollering right here in the best tweets of the night.

So who’s ready for the tenth—yes, tenth—debate of this cycle?


We started out with immediate attacks, with Bernie going after Bloomberg in a battle of old New Yorkers who think they know how to run your life.

Sanders said that Bloomberg was to close to China’s dictator.


Bloomberg countered that Bernie was also beloved of dictators.


Elizabeth Warren wanted to make clear that she really though Bernie Sanders was a fine fellow.

Though she couldn’t help but note that she was still better than him at their job.


Meanwhile, Biden jumped on Sanders for having been a supporter of Second Amendment rights for so many years, though Joe did magnanimously concede that Bernie wasn’t personally responsible for anyone’s murder.

They came back to the point from last debate about the stop-and-frisk program in New York while Bloomberg was mayor. His answer this time was smoother, but still didn’t really make any sense.

Pete Buttigieg added his own measured commentary.

Then Amy Klobuchar got a question…about Mike Bloomberg.


The action turned back to Warren, who tagged in and went after Bloomberg, for some reason.


Getting to the White House by becoming VP to the oldest, sickliest viable candidate? Yep, Warren Has A Plan For That.

She attacked him for allegedly telling an employee to get an abortion.


(Bloomberg denied having said it.)

True or not, it would surely buy Warren the same headlines as it did in the last debate, when she attacked Bloomberg viciously and won zero delegates in the Nevada caucus.

There was some more yelling.

Bernie got challenged on how he would pay for all of his promises.

Biden got a chance to speak, but used it to go after Tom Steyer, whom everyone forgot was there.


He took a page from Trump’s book and gave him a nickname.


More hollering followed.


The audience seemed to be on Bloomberg’s side. Suspiciously so…


Biden took another swing at Bernie on guns.


Bernie was first elected with NRA support, but he explained that they totally hate him now, giving him a D- in their last report card.


Klobuchar tried to split the difference, but no one was here for moderation (unless they were paid by Bloomberg).

The conversation turned to education, when Warren explained that unionized public schools are the only safe place for your children. Your children, not hers.

Bloomberg spoke up for charters, and got some possibly unpaid applause for it.


Then he tried to make a joke, and that was too much.

Buttigieg said something.

By now, things were getting a little nuts.


Biden and Klobuchar argued over who wrote a bill that was proposed after Joe left the Senate.

They talked of the coronavirus, but no one had anything really important to say. Hey, they’re politicians, not scientists.

This led to more talk of China.


Then the tour moved on to Israel, where Sanders said he’d maybe move the American embassy back to Tel Aviv because Netanyahu is bad.


Warren said where our embassy goes is … not up to us?

It was Lord of the Flies at this point, except for one man who still followed the rules of civilization.

As the time drew to an end, the moderaters asked: what is the biggest misconception about you, and what is your personal motto.


The answers were a lot like the “what is your biggest flaw” question in bad job interviews.

After another, pointless commercial break, the CBS moderators allowed the debate to end. after all the brouhaha, what was the big takeaway?

Kyle Sammin is a lawyer from Pennsylvania, a senior contributor to The Federalist, and the co-host of the Conservative Minds podcast. Read some of his other writing at his website, or follow him on Twitter at @KyleSammin.
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