Top 5 Most Ridiculous Reactions To Congress Passing Tax Bills

Top 5 Most Ridiculous Reactions To Congress Passing Tax Bills

At 2 a.m. Saturday morning, America, democracy, and all the “poor” people died, at least to hear the media and liberals tell it. In reality, the Senate barreled toward passing one of the most significant tax reforms in three decades, passing their version by a sliver, 51-49.

The bill is conventional in that it’s neither the best thing since legislation began, nor the death knell of all humanity. But that didn’t stop liberals from acting like Republicans had choked them by pushing a 479-page bill down their throats. Here are the most ridiculous reactions we’ve seen so far.

1. GOP Is Literally Killing People By Passing a Tax Bill

The tax bills roll back several aspects of the current tax code, eliminating some major tax preferences and limiting others, like the state and local tax deduction. In its current form, the bill drops the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 20 percent, which is incredible.

This Forbes writer says, “By doubling the standard deduction from $6,350 for single taxpayers/ $12,700 for married filing jointly to $12,400/$24,800, while simultaneously gutting the majority of itemized deductions, it is estimated that roughly 94 percent of taxpayers will claim the standard deduction in 2018.”

Still, some insisted basic procedural changes like this are tantamount to criminal activity, even murder—with a guillotine, no less.

While lower-income earners can’t get as big a tax rate slash because they pay by far the smallest share of U.S. taxes, and most pay no income taxes at all, other provisions will likely affect them positively. Still:

Ma’am, it’s a tax bill. It doesn’t do anything specifically to Medicaid or Medicare.

2. It’s Vile to Let People Keep More of Their Earnings

Under both bills, middle class and rich people will pay less in taxes. This is only a problem if you believe it’s fair to tax them at much higher rates than the rest of the country. Really, breaks for them are a much-deserved respite, as such folks have been paying the most income taxes for decades.

Besides, it’s almost impossible to cut taxes at all without cutting taxes for those who earn more than the national median, as these folks pay nearly all income taxes, period. As this Forbes piece again explains, “Under the Senate bill, the richest 1 percent — those earning more than $700,000 — will enjoy an increase in after-tax income in 2018 of 2.2 percent, and an average savings of $34,000 (by comparison, the middle class will see an increase of 1 percent – 1.5 percent in after-tax income in 2018).”

Naturally, liberals are angry at this slight reprieve in unequal taxation.

3. Claiming Jesus Would Hate This Bill

One of the most absurd reactions came from liberals who tout abortion as a pillar of their party yet claim this tax bill doesn’t represent Jesus’ values. It appears that liberals only pull out Jesus’ teachings when it’s a convenient talking point, and ignore him on other points, such as the personhood of the unborn and the immorality of theft.

4. Taking Less of People’s Earnings Is ‘Theft’

It’s not clear how freeing up some of the hard-earned cash Americans who fall into specific tax brackets earn robs other people of funds, but according to some people, it does. So either math is hard or it’s just easier to spew nonsense than understand basic economics. The tax bill is a lot of things, and it certainly isn’t perfect, but thievery is an overdramatic and just plain false charge.

5. We’re No Longer A Democracy Because Representatives Passed Bills

For the party that hardly seems to understand what democracy, means let alone appreciate this form of government, it’s bizarre to see liberals insist that duly elected representatives passing a bill with far fewer shenanigans than passing the sacrosanct Obamacare is somehow undemocratic.

 

Nicole Russell is a senior contributor to The Federalist. She lives in northern Virginia with her four kids. Follow her on Twitter @russell_nm.
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