lG Report: Andrew McCabe Repeatedly Leaked And Lied About It

lG Report: Andrew McCabe Repeatedly Leaked And Lied About It

Read the full report from the Department of Justice Inspector General detailing the former agent's pattern of leaks and deception at the FBI.

A newly released report from the Office of the Inspector General at the Justice Department states that former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe repeatedly leaked information to the press and lied about it.

McCabe, who was fired a day short of being eligible to receive his full pension, has loudly complained that his dismissal was unwarranted and politically motivated. But findings fleshed out in the OIG report fly in the face of McCabe’s narrative.

The report states that McCabe authorized another FBI agent to leak information about an ongoing investigation into Clinton Foundation to The Wall Street Journal, not in the interest of the public, but for his own personal gain.

We determined that as Deputy Director, McCabe was authorized to disclose the existence of the [Clinton Foundation] Investigation publicly if such a disclosure fell within the “public interest” exception in applicable FBI and DOJ policies generally prohibiting such a disclosure of an ongoing investigation. However, we concluded that McCabe’s decision to confirm the existence of the CF Investigation through an anonymously sourced quote, recounting the content of a phone call with a senior Department official in a manner designed to advance his personal interests at the expense of Department leadership, was clearly not within the public interest exception. We therefore concluded that McCabe’s disclosure of the existence of an ongoing investigation in this manner violated the FBI’s and the Department’s media policy and constituted misconduct.

He “lacked candor” (aka lied) both under oath and not under oath on repeated occasions about whether or not he was the one who authorized the leak to the press.

We found that, in a conversation with then-Director Comey shortly after the WSJ article was published, McCabe lacked candor when he told Comey, or made statements that led Comey to believe, that McCabe had not authorized the disclosure and did not know who did. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.5 (Lack of Candor – No Oath).

We also found that on May 9, 2017, when questioned under oath by FBI agents from INSD, McCabe lacked candor when he told the agents that he had not authorized the disclosure to the WSJ and did not know who did. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath). We further found that on July 28, 2017, when questioned under oath by the OIG in a recorded interview, McCabe lacked candor when he stated: (a) that he was not aware of Special Counsel having been authorized to speak to reporters around October 30 and (b) that, because he was not in Washington, D.C., on October 27 and 28, 2016, he was unable to say where Special Counsel was or what she was doing at that time. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath).

We additionally found that on November 29, 2017, when questioned under oath by the OIG in a recorded interview during which he contradicted his prior statements by acknowledging that he had authorized the disclosure to the WSJ, McCabe lacked candor when he: (a) stated that he told Comey on October 31, 2016, that he had authorized the disclosure to the WSJ; (b) denied telling INSD agents on May 9 that he had not authorized the disclosure to the WSJ about the PADAG call; and (c) asserted that INSD’s questioning of him on May 9 about the October 30 WSJ article occurred at the end of an unrelated meeting when one of the INSD agents pulled him aside and asked him one or two questions about the article. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath).

You can read the full report here.

Bre Payton is a staff writer at The Federalist. Follow her on Twitter.
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