Best Tweets Of The Fox Business GOP Debate

Best Tweets Of The Fox Business GOP Debate

This debate rodeo was a heckuva lot more fun and interesting than pretty much all the GOP debates so far.
Kyle Sammin
By

Last night’s Republican debate in Milwaukee began, as the first three did, with a pre-debate. This time, it was among the four candidates whose national polling has been stuck between 1 percent and 2.5 percent.
Chris Christie, demoted from the grown-up table, handled himself well, and provoked a lot of baseball analogies:


Mike Huckabee also joined the junior circuit, and reached back for the Henny Youngman material.

…but made some solid points:


Bobby Jindal, a fixture of the undercard, tried to set himself apart by attacking the other candidates’ records…


…but to little effect.


Rick Santorum again touted his support for the Export-Import Bank…


…while striking a pose.


But the main action came an hour later, in the main debate. Unlike in the CNBC debate, the Fox Business crew of moderators did not make themselves the story.


John Kasich, polling near the bottom among the major candidates, nevertheless led the field in interrupting…


…and generally getting on everyone’s nerves.


Jeb Bush, looking for a charismatic moment to spark his comeback, was an early Kasich victim…


…but later found his stride on finance…


…and foreign policy…


…while comparing Donald Trump’s strategic pronouncements to a game of … Monopoly?


Carly Fiorina was quiet early, but came out strong in the second half.


Ben Carson, the frontrunner in many polls, was calm and mostly effective…


…but, at times, less than coherent…


…and occasionally soporific.


Trump, recently displaced from the top of the polls, had flashes of normalcy…


…but mostly shot from the hip…


…and even got shut down by low-energy Jeb.


The candidates agreed on many of the questions, and directed much of their fire toward Hillary Clinton and the Democrats, but where there were policy disagreements, the liveliest parts of the evening mostly involved Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz, and Rand Paul.

As Santorum had earlier in the evening, Rubio praised welders and encouraged young people to enter the trades:


Cruz discussed entitlement reform, and set his sights on Rubio.

He also promised to eliminate the IRS…


…along with several other cabinet departments, with special attention to one of them:


Later, Paul and Rubio clashed over the choice between isolation and intervention…


…and Cruz tried his best to jump in.


This debate was more orderly than the last, and gave the voters a good opportunity to evaluate the candidates’ positions. But the evening ended with one question on everybody’s mind:

Kyle Sammin is a lawyer and writer from Pennsylvania. Read some of his other writing at kylesammin.com, or follow him on Twitter @KyleSammin.

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