Georgia Election Official Spent Tuesday Night On TV Playing Pundit And Bashing Trump

Georgia Election Official Spent Tuesday Night On TV Playing Pundit And Bashing Trump

Georgia’s voting system implementation manager Gabriel Sterling cast doubt on the GOP’s chances in the Georgia Senate runoff election on Tuesday night, airing his grievances about President Donald Trump and offering his pundit-like election predictions to the corporate media.

Instead of acknowledging concerns about some counties ceasing vote counts early in the night on prime time, Sterling spent at least 20 minutes of his time in the spotlight fueling the media’s narrative about Trump’s “voter fraud conspiracy theories.” When a CNN reporter asked who should be blamed if both Republican incumbents lost their seats, Sterling directed his frustration toward Trump.

“It will fall squarely on the shoulders of President Trump and his actions since Nov. 3,” Sterling replied, referring to Trump’s campaign against voter fraud in the Peach State. “When you tell people, your vote doesn’t count and has been stolen, and people start to believe that, then you go to the two senators and ask the secretary of state to resign and trigger a civil war in the Republican Party when we need to unite, all of that stems with his decision-making since the Nov. 3 election.”

Sterling also claimed that Trump “single-handedly divided the party” when the president demanded that Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger resign.

In another interview with CNN on Tuesday night, Sterling could not provide a straight answer about how many outstanding votes were left in the state. Instead, he continued to push the narrative that the potential downfall of the GOP’s control of the Senate rests on Trump.

“The President of the United States is 100 percent, four square responsible, with a little added assist from Doug Collins, who decided to run in that Senate jungle primary, which helped split the party. … Then you create a civil war within the GOP, when the GOP probably wanted to unite their vote to turn out. Those are the kind of things the president is solely responsible for doing,” Sterling said, adding that Republicans “maybe need to rethink the tactics that they have been using and the messages they’ve been using to get out.”

While Sterling tried to clarify that his doubts about Trump and the GOP were a “personal opinion,” he was introduced on CNN multiple times and other news shows Tuesday evening as an explicitly labeled “election official.”

“From the numbers that we’re looking at now, it doesn’t look good for the two incumbent Republican senators,” he told WSB-TV of Atlanta.

Sterling’s willingness to offer political opinions as an election official was criticized by some people, who noted that not only was it inappropriate given his title, but it was also strange since some Georgia counties ceased counting votes early in the night.

Sterling, who has expressed frustrations with Trump and Republicans in the past, is often praised by those in the corporate media who claim that he does a wonderful job of “debunking” Trump’s lies.

Jordan Davidson is a staff writer at The Federalist. She graduated from Baylor University where she majored in political science and minored in journalism.
Photo Gabriel Sterling
Most Popular
Related Posts