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Genital Mutilation Supporters Are Upset That Bella Hadid Got A Nose Job At 14

Bella Hadid got a nose job at 14
Image CreditVogue/YouTube

The people who encourage kids to pursue genital mutilation are upset that Bella Hadid’s mother signed off on a nose job she wanted as a teen.

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The same people who encourage five-year-olds to participate in radical gender ideology and genital mutilation experiments that often lead to transition regret are upset that supermodel Bella Hadid’s mother signed off on a nose job she wanted as a young teen and now mourns.

Hadid, who is now 25 years old, recently admitted in an interview with Vogue that she first received a nose job at the ripe young age of 14 but now regrets the decision.

“I wish I had kept the nose of my ancestors,” Hadid, who has Dutch and Palestinian roots, said in the April 2022 cover interview. “I think I would have grown into it.”

Hadid’s regret sparked outrage on Twitter from users furious that a child could follow through on such a big, physically altering decision without mature and serious thought. Among those buzzing about Hadid’s plastic surgery are people even angrier that the “Real Housewives of Beverly Hills” star Yolanda Hadid would sign off on the procedure, which has now caused her daughter some emotional turmoil.

Even USA Today, which named a male assistant secretary for health for the Department of Health and Human Services Rachel Levine as one of its “Women of the Year,” published an article questioning “how young is too young for plastic surgery?”

While the article notes that cosmetic procedures are increasingly common among teens and are easily acquired with approval from a parent or guardian, the author amplifies experts who call the underage practice “dangerous” and “concerning.”

Deciding to get plastic surgery, the article continues, can produce harmful or painful side effects that are not fully understood by teens who have yet to “emotionally mature.” As a result, kids are likely to feel some level of regret, much like Hadid, for making a premature and uninformed decision aided by their parents.

USA Today makes an excellent point about the dangers of children physically altering their bodies before fully maturing, but the publication would be hard-pressed to admit the same thing about hormone blockers, binding, and other physically altering “treatments” often prescribed to young children who may or may not be seriously questioning their sex.

Kids who are labeled “gender confused” are often encouraged to undergo physical transition by parents, doctors, therapists, and even public school officials, but real studies show that teens who naturally navigate puberty have a 60 to 90 percent chance of outgrowing the desire to discard biology (desistance) in favor of cosmetic changes. Unfortunately, children who aren’t even of the legal age of consent in most states can be put on puberty blockers by parents, which drastically decreases the chances of desistance.

When Hadid admitted that she regretted her nose job, she was met with loads of support and righteous anger from people who saw the horrors of allowing children to move forward with life-changing decisions that often yield hefty consequences. Hadid should have embraced the way she was born, they agreed with her regret. Heaven forbid, however, that we encourage children to embrace their bodies and God-given sex.

There’s a massive push from leftists, Democrats, the corporate media, Big Tech, and more to accept dangerous and risky procedures for children that can lead to sterility, severe dysfunction, and myriad other health problems as well as an exponentially higher risk of suicide, yet they lament that a teen is allowed to change the appearance of her nose with parental consent.

Even Hadid signed a letter by radical group GLAAD last year that advocated for “gender liberation,” dissed Republican laws designed to protect girls’ sports, and declared that “transgender women are women and that transgender girls are girls.” Her support for the dangerous genital mutilation surgeries that often accompany these things, however, is misguided and hypocritical.

When it comes to her nose, maybe Hadid is right. She probably shouldn’t have been making such a weighty decision about her physical appearance as a young teen. Likewise, neither should other children, who are not emotionally and physically mature enough to participate in lots of societal activities like sex, working, and driving, be making life-changing decisions that will affect their bodies forever.