Tony Daniel
Tony Daniel
tonydaniel
Tony Daniel is the author of 11 fantasy and science fiction novels, the latest of which is young adult fantasy, "The Amber Arrow." His science fiction books include "Guardian of Night" and two Star Trek novels. He’s also an award-winning short story writer. Daniel has co-written screenplays for monster movies that appear on the SyFy and Chiller Channels including the films "Beneath" and "Flu Birds." In the long ago 2000s, he wrote and directed numerous audio dramas for SCIFI.COM starring actors such as Stanley Tucci, Oliver Platt, Kyra Sedgwick, and Lou Diamond Phillips. Daniel’s nonfiction has appeared in The American Spectator, The Seattle Times, Stuff, Maxim UK, and The Stranger. In addition to writing, Daniel is a senior editor at Baen Books. His website is tonydaniel.com.
How Tom Wolfe Reinvented Journalism And The Great American Novel

Tom Wolfe set a new standard in both the world of fiction and nonfiction, and with his passing, all we’re left with are pipsqueak visionaries.

Why You Can Never Truly Take The ‘Batsh-ttery’ Out Of Social Media

Viral tweet: ‘Before the internet, everyone…thought most other ppl weren’t batsh-t.. Once we could all see how batsh-t everyone else was, we gave up the old charade.’ Not quite.

‘The Hellfire Club’ Burns Up Readers’ Patience

CNN host Jake Tapper’s new novel, ‘The Hellfire Club,’ is a regrettable Washington thriller full of cardboard characters, absurd plotting, and relentless historical exposition.

‘The Monk Of Mokha’ Delivers An Entertaining Tale Weakened By Identity Politics And Economic Nonsense

Celebrated writer Dave Eggers has written a mostly compelling novel about immigrants and American entrepreneurship that gets sidetracked by a pointless desire to affirm liberal politics.

Your Kids Don’t Want To Read? Make Them Miserable Until They Do!

They may hate me for it. They may be traumatized for life. But at least my son can never say he didn’t read ‘Misty of Chincoteague’ when he was young.

A Master Of Historical Fiction Takes On Shakespeare

In ‘Fools and Mortals,’ Bernard Cornwell brings a lighter version of the grit and contention of his military historical fiction to Shakespeare’s theater.

‘The 15:17 to Paris’ Shows The Imprint Of Clint Eastwood’s Masterly Hand

Clint Eastwood’s surprising choice to cast the people who were the real heroes of the Paris attack works beautifully.

Pulitzer Prize-Winner Claims ‘Super-White’ Children’s Books Ruined His Youth

Looking back, it turns out that no book I ever read was about me. None of that matters when reading fiction. But celebrated author Junot Díaz just doesn’t get it.

Canadian Linguistic Delight ‘Letterkenny’ May Be The Best Comedy On TV Right Now

The show’s mostly middle-of-the-road politics are refreshing next to so many other comedies that have surrendered their creativity to wallow in the sloughs of progressive hate.

Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Is A Delightful, Paint-By-Numbers Urban Fantasy

‘Bright’ has proved a nice antidote for the Great December Disappointment of 2017, the pretentious, awful Star Wars offering, ‘The Last Jedi.’

In Mark Helprin’s Latest, A Master Novelist Confronts Music And Mortality

Mark Helprin’s latest novel, ‘Paris in the Present Tense,’ is an ode to fighting anti-Semitism, the beauty of music, and never giving up hope.

Despite Its Wokeness, ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Shows How Comedy Is Deeply Conservative

‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ is the story of a young artist coming of age and into her own. Midge finds that art doesn’t have much to do with becoming an agent of change.