Washington Post Feeds Into The Delusions Of ‘Racial Justice’ Activists

Washington Post Feeds Into The Delusions Of ‘Racial Justice’ Activists

Conveniently, the author of the story in the Post (literally an intern) didn’t bother getting into the details of what actually happened that night.
Eddie Scarry
By

The “racial justice” people are nothing if not delusional, and the degree to which they are can’t possibly be overstated. Nor can the national media’s role in reinforcing that delusion.

The Washington Post last week ran what I hope will be the final hagiographic story about the months-long protests that took place in front Nellie’s, a gay bar in Washington, D.C. Demonstrators had been gathering on the street every Friday for weeks, demanding “accountability” over an incident in June involving a black woman who was aggressively kicked out of the bar by a bouncer.

“On a busy Friday night,” the Washington Post story began, “people headed to the well-known, often bustling bar on the corner of Ninth and U streets. But for the last time, the party wasn’t inside the bar. It was outside.”

Included in the online version of the story was a video with interviews of a couple of protesters. One of them named Afeni says that the boycott against Nellie’s “is important because they have showed a blatant disrespect for black people, they have showed a blatant disrespect for the demands of the community and they do not hold themselves accountable.” By “accountable,” she said she meant “paying reparations,” “apologizing” and “atoning for your actions.”

The video shows others chanting, singing, and line dancing in the street.

Fae, another demonstrator, said, “The greatest form of resistance is black joy because black people are given the least room to be joyful, are given the least things to be joyful.” She said the display was “revolutionary” that “this joy that you see here today, like, that is going to be what gets our demands, along with the hard work and blood and sweat and tears, that so many black friends have been putting into this effort.”

To these people, hijacking a busy highway intersection for twerking is revolutionary.

Those “demands,” by the way, were met weeks ago. At least the ones that were coherent. The owner, Doug Schantz, issued a public apology to 22-year-old Keisha Young, who Schantz said was treated “inappropriately, unsafely and disrespectfully.” He fired the contractor that had provided security for that night in June. He hired a trans person of color as “director of community engagement.” And he attempted to hire Collective Action for Safe Spaces, one of those shyster “sensitivity training” firms, but was rebuffed because the organization said that it didn’t believe the overture by Schantz was made “in good faith.”

There wasn’t much left to do, other than “reparations,” which is intentionally never defined by the people who want them so that they can indefinitely prolong the conflict and make yet more demands.

This is all over a woman who was ejected from Nellie’s by a bouncer. Conveniently, the author of the story in the Post (literally an intern named Jasmine Hilton) didn’t bother getting into the details of what actually happened that night.

Videos posted on social media show Young on the second floor of the bar with about three other men who are fighting, plus two security guards attempting to intervene. Young is raining blows on one of the men who is seen trying to cover his head with his arms. As she’s absolutely wilding out in the fight, the guard reaches over the group of men and yanks Young by the shirt down the steps to remove her from the violence that she was actively participating in.

The altercation supposedly had something to do with Young or someone associated with her bringing outside alcohol into the bar, which is prohibited.

Most tellingly, though, is that nowhere in the Post article it mentioned that the bouncer who grabbed Young is — black.

Only in America can a bunch of delusional “racial justice” freaks see a black man put his hands on a black woman and conclude that it’s another episode of white supremacy.

But the Post article did quote a demonstrator named Frankie Seabron, who said that the protests created a “space” where “I can be my whole, total self in a world that continues to tell me that being that is not enough.” She added, “When I see Keisha, I see me.”

I hope not. Otherwise Seabron might be justifiably dragged out of a bar, too. But this is what it means to be delusional.

Eddie Scarry is the D.C. columnist at The Federalist and author of "Privileged Victims: How America's Culture Fascists Hijacked the Country and Elevated Its Worst People."

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