Meet The Real American Heroes Saving Harvey Survivors Stranded In Texas

Meet The Real American Heroes Saving Harvey Survivors Stranded In Texas

After Hurricane Harvey hit Texas over the weekend, rescue efforts are underway to bring survivors to safety amid rising floodwaters. Large swaths of the Lone Star State remain underwater, and rain is expected to continue falling for several more days. The state is anticipating a total of 50 inches of rain in what many are calling an unprecedented flood that has killed at least three people thus far.

Police, firemen, rescue workers, military personnel, and volunteers stepped up to help their fellow Americans. Their stories will restore your faith in humanity.

These Harris County Sheriff officers rescued this man who’d been stuck in eight feet of water for 12 hours.

Sheriff’s officers rescued two small children from their home while it was being engulfed in water.

This man carried a mother and her baby to safety amid waist-high waters.

Members of the so-called “Cajun Navy,” a group of recreational boat owners and grassroots volunteers who rescued people during the Louisiana Flood of 2016. mobilized to help out thousands of Texans left stranded.

When a reporter asked this man what he planned to do with his boat, he responded: “I’m going to go save some lives.”

CNN captured the moment this man with a boat saved an elderly man from his flooded home.

This deputy reportedly rescued people throughout the night until he could no longer stand.

Texas police herded cattle from higher ground to save them from drowning.

This man rescued a lost dog from the side of the road and reunited him with his owner by sharing a video of him on Twitter.

This 15-year-old boy rescued people all day Sunday.

This pastor searched for people who might be trapped inside their cars.

The Gonzales family rescued at least nine other families in Houston, Texas.

This rescue worker saved these two small dogs after helping their owners escape the floodwaters.

One downtown Houston couple wasn’t affected by the flooding, other than being stuck at home. Instead of just sitting around, they collected wet clothes from people staying at a nearby shelter and dried them.

“We donated extra blankets and pillows and clothes,” Rachel Noise, of Houston, said. “Our neighbors are collecting dog food and dog bowls. Everyone looks homeless down here. They’re either wet and carrying garbage bags of donated items or wet and carrying garbage bags of their belongings. At least we’re doing something instead of watching the horrible news.”

The Texas National Guard will deploy 3,000 more troops to the areas of Texas severely affected by flooding to continue saving those who remain stranded.

Bre Payton is a staff writer at The Federalist. Follow her on Twitter.
comments powered by Disqus
Most Popular
Related Posts