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How Stupid Is The Georgia Anti-Trump Case? They Indicted Trump For Tweeting At People To Watch TV

Willis Indictment
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Here is a run-down of the ‘conspiratorial’ acts cited by the Fulton County district attorney’s office in the unprecedented indictment.

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A local prosecutor in Georgia has become Democrats’ latest instrument of election interference, unveiling a fourth round of indictments against former President Donald Trump Monday night that cites activities like encouraging voters to tune into televised broadcasts.

Hours after Atlanta prosecutors prematurely uploaded the Trump indictments to an official government website, the Fulton County district attorney’s office secured the long-sought charges against the Republican frontrunner 15 months before the next election. Fani Willis successfully indicted 19 total defendants she plans to bring to trial together.

With 13 additional counts from Georgia prosecutors over objections to the 2020 presidential election, Trump is now faced with 91 charges as he leads the race for next year’s Republican nomination. Those now facing charges along with the former president include Trump’s last White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and attorney Rudy Giuliani.

Here is a run-down of the “conspiratorial” acts cited by the Fulton County district attorney’s office in the unprecedented indictment.

Asking for Phone Numbers Is ‘Conspiracy’

The Fulton Country prosecutor indicted Meadows for soliciting phone numbers from a pair of Pennsylvania lawmakers.

“Meadows sent a text message to United States Representative Scott Perry from Pennsylvania and stated, ‘can you send me the number for the speaker and the leader of PA Legislature. POTUS wants to chat with them,'” the indictment reads. “This was an overt act in furtherance of the conspiracy.”

Encouraging Voters to Watch Television Is ‘Conspiracy’

Act 22 cited in the Georgia indictment charged Trump with conspiracy for encouraging supporters to watch hearings broadcast on One America News Network.

“Georgia hearings now on [One America News Network]. Amazing!” the president tweeted.

“This was an overt act in furtherance of the conspiracy,” the indictment read.

Act 100 of the indictment faulted the president for encouraging supporters to tune into Newsmax.

Act 101 listed another tweet that encouraged supporters to tune into the Right Side Broadcasting Network as an act of “conspiracy.”

Grassroots Campaigning Is ‘Conspiracy’

Act 38 of the criminal indictment charged Giuliani for retweeting a “Patriot Call to Action” that encouraged voters to call their members of Congress to advocate for their cause.

The tweet stated, “Georgia Patriot Call to Action: today is the day we need you to call your state Senate & House Reps & ask them to sign the petition for a special session. We must have free & fair elections in GA & a this is our only path to ensuring every legal vote is counted @realDonald Trump.”

“This was an overt act in furtherance of the conspiracy,” the indictment read.

Reserving Rooms Is ‘Conspiracy’

Defendant David Shafer was indicted for reserving a room at the Georgia Capitol in December 2020. Reserving the room, which was used for a meeting of alternate presidential electors, was declared by prosecutors “an overt act in furtherance of the conspiracy.”

Seeking Signature Verification Is ‘Conspiracy’

Act 32 of the criminal indictment charged Trump for calling on Georgia state leaders to ensure “signature verification & call a Special Session.”

According to Willis, the Dec. 6, 2020, tweet “was an overt act in furtherance of the conspiracy.”

Encouraging Someone to Attend a Hearing Is ‘Conspiracy’

Act 45 of the indictment faults defendant Michael Roman for requesting an unidentified “unindicted co-conspirator” to encourage co-defendant Misty Hampton to attend a House committee hearing in Georgia on election fraud.

“This was an overt act in furtherance of the conspiracy,” the indictment read.

Encouraging Special Legislative Sessions Is ‘Conspiracy’

Act 28 of the indictment charged Trump for meeting with the Pennsylvania House speaker to encourage a special session of the assembly.

“This was an overt act in furtherance of the conspiracy,” the indictment read.

Act 31 of the indictment charged Trump for making the same request to Georgia Republican Gov. Brian Kemp.

Act 42 charged the former president with a felony offense for making the same request for a special session of the assembly to the Georgia House speaker.

Phone Calls to Lawmakers Are ‘Conspiracy’

Trump made two phone calls to President Pro Tempore of the Georgia Senate Butch Miller. The two calls, dated Dec. 3 and Dec. 26, 2020, were “an overt act in furtherance of the conspiracy,” according to the indictment.


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