Sam Smith Can’t Ever Know What It Feels Like To Be A Woman

Sam Smith Can’t Ever Know What It Feels Like To Be A Woman

Our identity as male or female is not based on our subjective perceptions. It’s based on an objective reality, and the fixed nature of our bodies tells us what that reality is.
D.C. McAllister
By

Singer Sam Smith has a new song out: “I feel like a woman.” I’m just kidding, of course. That’s a song sung by a real woman. Smith isn’t anything like a real woman, but he feels like one, so he’s being applauded by a mentally corrupt culture for expressing his new identity as gender non-binary, androgynous, gender-fluid, yabba dabba doo.

I say mentally corrupt because we now have a cool, hip, logically fluid culture, both in media and academia, that rejects objective sexual realities and espouses sexual relativism—an inevitable outcome of rampant subjectivism. The notion that our mental perceptions solely determine the certainty of our experience—regardless of the obvious realities of the physical world, including our bodies—drives us to believe we can be whatever we imagine.

The cold, hard fact is, we can’t. Even with all the technology in the world “transforming” us into what we want to be, we are who we are—male or female—not because we were assigned a sex at birth against our will, but because we were naturally fashioned in the womb as a little boy or little girl. Strip away the technology, and the real you—that boy or that girl—is what remains. That is what is real.

Feelings Don’t Always Tell the Truth

The cult of subjectivism isn’t based in reality, and it leads to the creation of new sexual identities that can theoretically equal the number of individuals on the planet. We have androgyne, culturally specific gender identity, demigender, pangender, bigender, neutrosis, xenogender, intergender . . . ad nauseam.

It’s all ridiculous, really. That would make me gender-phobic or trans-phobic, I guess. I don’t know what I’m supposed to be afraid of, exactly, but merely speaking dissent in favor of objective reality makes a person “phobic” these days. But I’ll do it anyway, not because I want to hurt Smith’s feelings, but because I reject subjectivism. Our identity as male or female is not based on our subjective feelings or perceptions. It’s based on an objective reality, and the fixed nature of our bodies (without the barbarous mutilation and manipulation of it by science) tells us what that reality is.

The gender-fluid crowd would protest at this point, saying gender is not the same as sex. I agree. Gender is an artificial, meaningless social construct based on a person’s perception of himself regardless of his actual sex, but it is being used as a linguistic hammer to de-sex society and thereby erode our very real human distinctions.

As cultural commentator Stella Morabito writes, “The main effect of gender ideology is to replace sex, a word that points to something real and recognizable, with ‘gender,’ which exists only in a person’s mind. Succumbing to usage of the term ‘gender’ is a trap that sucks you into Orwellian anti-reality.”

Regardless of how Smith feels, he’s a man. “Gender” has nothing to do with it. To say he feels like a woman is to call into question his sex. Even he is forced to use binary language to describe himself when he says, “I feel just as much woman as I am man.” If he means he has “feminine side,” as in the masculine/feminine energies we all have within us, then fine.

But we all know that’s not what he means. To have feminine energies is not the same as “feeling like a woman,” to feel “female,” which expresses itself in outwardly identifying as a woman, however that’s perceived in any given society.

“To be human is to be male or female,” Morabito writes. “To be human is to be the living, breathing union of one male and one female. No exceptions. This is the case whether you are male or female or intersex, and, yes, even if you identify as transgender. Furthermore, our sex is not a body part. It is inscribed into the DNA of every cell in our bodies.”

Being a Woman Is Not About Clothing and Makeup

Despite this objective reality, Smith insists he “feels like woman.” As reported in Vogue:

‘There was one moment in my life where I didn’t own a piece of male clothing, really,’ he said. ‘I would wear full makeup every day in school, eyelashes, leggings with Dr. Martens, and huge fur coats—for two and a half years.’ Smith has recently sported outfits ranging from a clashing printed blazer-and-trousers combo to a jeans-and-T-shirt look that he finished off with a pair of towering platform red heels.

So, this is what it feels like to be a woman? As a woman, I’m surprised. I didn’t know it was so easy. The truth is, how I dress doesn’t really make me feel like a woman one way or another, just as dressing like a man doesn’t make me feel like a man. It just makes me feel like a woman wearing man’s clothes.

Here’s the thing. Smith, and any other man of his gender-bending ilk, has no idea what it really feels like to be a woman. He has no idea what it’s like to grow up as a little girl with estrogen and progesterone pumping through your body as your breasts develop, as your menstruation cycle begins, an experience to be repeated every month with painful regularity. He has no idea what it’s like to be smaller-boned than a man, more fragile because of how we’re made. He doesn’t have a clue about female vulnerability.

Smith has no idea what it’s like to have a feminine spirit joined with a female body, to feel the creative energies that unite thought and form, experiencing the rhythms of femininity that can’t be separated because they are part of who we are as a complete human being, as a complete woman.

Even though all women don’t have babies, they have the parts to make them. For those of us who have lived through this exclusively female experience, we know what this aspect of being a woman feels like. Smith has never felt a baby move within him, his body take on a life of its own with excruciating contractions, or his breasts fill with milk to nourish a newborn boy or girl. No man has. And, no, a woman who has “transitioned” into a man and gets pregnant is not a pregnant man. She’s a woman pretending to be a man who has gotten pregnant.

Any man who twitters on about feeling like a woman is an offense to real woman everywhere. We are not the sum total of red pumps and rose petal blush. To say this is simply a form of gender expression doesn’t mean a thing, and these sexual relativists know it, which is why so many want to be identified as female, get fake female parts, fake breasts, fake hormones, fake vaginas. It’s all fake. There’s nothing genuine, real, or authentic about it. It’s a plastic mockery to the beauty of being a woman.

If Smith or anyone else wants to play dress up, then by all means, they can. But don’t expect me to affirm your subjective perceptions and sexual relativism by playing along and parroting the terminology. You’re not anything special. You’re a man dressed up in a woman’s clothing. That’s all. It’s not an identity. It’s a behavior. And I don’t have to approve, affirm, or applaud your behavior.

Denise C. McAllister is a journalist based in Charlotte, North Carolina, and a senior contributor to The Federalist. Follow her on Twitter @McAllisterDen.

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